LaTeX math cheatsheets

My girlfriend asked for LaTeX cheatsheets. There are many of them online, but she was specifically looking for notational commands for algebra and number theory. You need to be aware that notation is very specific for your teacher. So standardization has not been successful to raise mathematical symbols from a representational to a semantical level. In US/UK/AU (in my experience), there is little information encoded in notation and information is provided in short, concise sentences. In Europe, this is different and every teacher has his/her own notation.

But let’s get back to the point: I recommend the following cheatsheets, but evaluate yourself whether it fits your field.

If you need a more comprehensive reference, the LaTeX wikibook is a nice start. For a german audience, LaTeX@TUGraz also does a good job IMHO.

And as always: If you look for a symbol and have internet connection, detexify makes your life much easier!

LaTeX math cheatsheets

My second Kyusho experience

Today, on 15th of November 2015, our level 1 Kyusho course ended. I had my first experience with Kyusho in February when instructor Robert Göslbauer joined us in an introductory course for our association. Unlike the first time which was unstructured and rather application-oriented, this time he specifically covered all aspects of the Kyusho level 1 exam for all ~30 participants.

Robert showed us the majority of vital points along meridians described in Chinese medicine. They are used in a negative way potentially knocking out the opponent or losing neurological control in a certain part of the body. This demonstration uses vital point “Triple Warmer 17”, which can be very painful when applied properly. Vital points on the head like that one can make you feel dizzy, which is why regeneration can be important as can be seen in this video.

And why do I point out the word “experience” so much? I recognized two interesting effects: Even though you don’t move a lot, just by using the vital points, you feel exhausted afterwards. The pain itself affects your body similar to Budo training. You become more and more sensitive on the points. After applying the techniques multiple times, a little touch to the skin might already trigger pain (well, this is what my arm in the elbow felt like). However, this makes applying vital points in Jitsu combat more difficult, because in Jitsu (unlike Do arts like Aikido) you actually want to hurt the opponent and the first hit must be more precise than the following ones.

I am looking forward to taking the level 1 exam in the next months.

My second Kyusho experience