no actual ‘creative’ work

I just found that in the TU Graz newsgroup and I think it is worth sharing to the general public.
I am censoring his name, because I don’t want to associate him with the quote he apologized for (as stated below).

> It is about allowing “intense discussion” with another person, without
> fearing to get accused of “cheating” afterwards. What else would be
> the reason for group work in such a case!? Discussing your solution
> line by line with another person can help learning. That’s what the
> teacher is aiming for (I assume).

As far as I know the thing we’re talking about is simply mathematics,
no programming or actual ‘creative’ work so far.
The results, and most likely also the steps to come there, will be the
same for everyone.

Maria points out an awkwardness of this followup:

On 2015-03-26 11:32, {CENSORED} wrote:
> …simply mathematics…

> …no actual ‘creative’ work…

ymmd

Maria

YMMD too 😉 His followup:

Ouch :’-(
Now even though this is the flames ng I’m still sorry about that.
I hope it does not hurt that bad in the context it was written in :\

no actual ‘creative’ work

Evaluation quote

This guy!!! I literally could write 2000 characters, and I wouldn’t mind at all. I would NOT be surpriced if one day [insert some powerful government agency] knocks on his door and asks for a help to save a planet with his master mind and IT skillz. I can only imagine how awesome as a Proffesor he would be. Honestly, I really hope that one day I get to at least half of his level. If you actually can read this than remember: With great power comes great responsibility xd

In the “positive feedback” section of this year’s course evaluation about me. Some people are just motivating, creative and funny 🙂

Evaluation quote

Was wirst du, wenn du groß bist? Ach, du bist ja n Mädl…

„Na, wirst du auch ein Flieger werden? Was? Wenn du groß bist, wirst du es.
Was wirst du? Ach, du bist ja ‘n Mädel…“

Hermann Göring fragt Kinder, was sie wollen werden, wenn sie groß sind. Seine Reaktion, als er entdeckt, dass das Kind ein Mädchen ist.

Fand es gerade unterhaltsam in Zusammenhang mit den aktuellen Sexismus-Diskussionen im Netz.

via Hitlers Helfer – Hermann Göring – Der zweite Mann

Was wirst du, wenn du groß bist? Ach, du bist ja n Mädl…

The top 10 signs you’re a computer scientist

  1. You explain your kids the clock using the word “modulo”
  2. If you terminate all your sentences with a NULL byte\0
  3. If you extend your 101-keys-keyboard for 42 more keys
  4. If you answer infinity calculations in math courses with “BufferOverflow”
  5. If you have to andl $-16, %esp your priority queue if your boss assigns you a new task
  6. If you think you know more about inheritance than biologists
  7. If execution, command and kill are harmless words for you
  8. If you think that 2 spaces are missing in the source code, but you cannot explain the why to someone else.
  9. If (0.1 + 0.7) * 10 is anything else than 8 for you
  10. You expected a list with 102 elements here

based on spikedmath:456.

The top 10 signs you’re a computer scientist

Math behind “Rope around the globe”

Some people will know the mathematical problem:

Take a rope and tie it around a tennis ball very tightly. Cut the rope and add an extra meter of length. If you lay the rope around the tennis ball in a circle again, you will get a distance of 16 cm between the rope and the ball.

Now consider the same for the earth. Assuming a perfect globe with an equator of 40 000 km and an additional meter for the rope: What will the distance between earth and the rope be?

Tennis ball (3.35 cm radius):

U1 = 2 × 0.0335 × π
U2 = U1 + 1
r2 = U2 / 2π
r2 = ~0.19265 m
r2 – r1 = 0.19265 – 0.0335 = +0.15915m

Globe (40 000 m radius):

U1 = 2 × 40000 × π
U2 = U1 + 1
r2 = U2 / 2π
r2 = ~40000.1591 m
r2 – r1 = 40000.1591 – 40000 = +0.15915m

Conclusion

The distance is always about 16cm for an additional meter. This comes from the formula r = U / 2π. You can separate the constant from the variables: r2 = U1 / 2π + 1 / 2π. So the 16cm is actually parameter / 2π.

Math behind “Rope around the globe”